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Why Clean and Repair Turnout Gear?

NFPA 1851 Standard on Selection, Care and Maintenance of Protective Ensembles for Structural Fire Fighting, 2014 Edition, calls for the Advanced Cleaning and Advanced Inspection of all protective ensemble elements every 12 months, or whenever routine inspections indicate that a problem could exist.

Clean, well-maintained turnout gear:

  • performs better
  • lasts longer
  • exhibits increased visibility
  • contains no residue that can flash
  • contains no toxins that can be released into the firefighters’ breathing space
  • prevents long-term exposure to biological contaminants and blood borne pathogens
  • limits the potential for heat stress
  • is less likely to conduct heat and potentially become flammable
  • reduces the risk of death, burns, combustion and diseases
  • improves the effectiveness of the moisture barrier

Why choose Turnout Management?

  • Over a decade of service to fire departments throughout the country
  • Fast turnaround time
  • Verified ISP ensures compliance with NFPA 1851 and independent assessment of gear
  • Recommended by leading protective clothing manufacturers
  • Free return shipping for service orders over $50.00
  • Online tracking and record-keeping to meet to NFPA 1851 requirements

Receipt of Soiled PPE Policy

Adapted from Honeywell First Responder Products

Due to hazards associated with the handling of potentially contaminated gear, Turnout Management performs a simple soil transfer test on all garments that are received to determine if the garment is clean enough to be handled by our staff. White paper is wiped along the garment. If there is any residue, ash or transfer of any kind, the garment fails the test. If the garment fails this test, the garment will be laundered at our facility and there will be a charge included on the work report summary. We apologize for any inconvenience this transfer test may cause; however, the safety and health of our employees is of the utmost concern at Turnout Management.

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